FROM THE ARCHIVES.WHERE THE WILD THINGS ARE. DANDELION BUTTER. FRITTATA OF THE THINGS WINTER LEFT BEHIND.

DANDELION BUTTER AND FRITTATA OF THE THINGS WINTER LEFT BEHIND.

It has been a while since I have been upstate. Work has kept me traveling and while that has been nice I have been missing my wild adventures in Upstate New York. This has been a busy year and much has changed. I looked back to see what I was up to this time last year. Dandelion butter and wild frittata's and weekend's with friends are are what came up on the blog.

They are what I have been dreaming about this week as the sun is finally shining here in NYC and I get a few days to head up to the mountains. Though the below post was exactly year ago it feels entirely apropos. I thought I would re-share with you.

xx

By the time we got upstate this year summer was nearly around the corner. Though I have mentioned before that spring comes late to our side of the mountain, this winter was especially brutal. By memorial day, most but not all of the ramps were beginning to wither back. The dry spring had mostly eradicated the wild watercress along our various springs which are running feebly at best this year. I picked what I could that winter had been kind enough to leave behind, big piles of dandelion blossom, dandelion leaves, wild mustard greens, wild mustard flower, chives, spring garlic,  wild mint, sorrel and ramp leaves. I set the dandelion blossom aside for butter and washed the rest of the greens. I chopped the bulbs of spring garlic and mixed them into the greens. I put  a generous dose of olive oil on the bottom of a heavy large cast iron frying pan and then I  piled the greens on top. I whisked up a dozen eggs, their yolks a bright yellow, added about a half a cup of grated pecorino, a dash of celtic sea salt and a few turns of the pepper mill.

 

FRITTATA OF THE THINGS WINTER LEFT BEHIND

 

12 ORGANIC EGGS

COPIOUS PILE OF WILD ORGANIC GREENS SUCH AS DANDELION,MINT, MUSTARD, SORREL AND SPRING GARLIC.

1/2 CUP PLUS A BIT MORE OF A VERY GOOD OLIVE OIL. PREFERABLY A DARK LUSCIOUS GREEN ONE.

1/2 CUP PLUS A BIT MORE GRATED PECORINO ROMANO

GREY CELTIC SEA SALT

COURSE BLACK PEPPER 

LARGE CAST IRON FRYING PAN

 

I poured the egg mixture over the greens and set on Julian’s mid heat Aga burner covered for ten minutes or so. I watched it carefully so the bottom would not burn. I am not super used to cooking with an Aga so it took a little extra watching and patience. When the eggs started to puff up around the greens it was time to remove the lid and transfer the frittata  to the oven. I hit the top with a dash of olive oil and some more freshly grated pecorino before placing it in the oven. I cooked it in the mid range temp oven until it was just golden abot ten more minutes. We served it room temperature. The key to a good frittata is a dozen eggs and copious amounts of olive oil. The frittata’s from Puglia, where my grandmother was from are made this way. What's not to love about olive oil?

 


 

DANDELION BUTTER

This beautiful vibrant yellow butter is all about early Summer. As kids we ran around with a fistful of dandelions and thrust it under anyone's chin we could find yelling do you like butter!? yes! you like butter! The yellow reflection of the petals was meant to be sign that said participant did indeed like butter. It is from the memory of that adventure that this idea was born.

Start by collecting a bunch of dandelion blossoms.

Gently pull the petals away from the tiny bulb at the base of the neck.

 

1 qt. of organic heavy cream

1 cup of bright yellow dandelion petals.

1 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

 

Combine the heavy cream and the dandelion petals  in a small food processor or blender.( I find it hard to scrape the butter from a deep blender)

Pulse on high speed for two minutes or so until the solids start to slap the sides of the processor and clearly separate from the liquids.

Holding the butter in place tip the processor to drain off the excess liquids.

Pulse a few more times.

Remove the solids into a wooden bowl and the run ice cold water over the butter until it firms up a bit more.

With the back side of a wooden spoon work the butter back and forth against the side of the wooden bowl to remove any leftover liquids.

When done transfer to a container and serve.

The butter will keep it an airtight container in your fridge for a week or so.

I topped my butter with a sprinkle of pine tip salt.

Serve with homemade crackers or on a fresh pasta or your favorite bread.

 

 

FRENCH TOAST. ROSE PETAL. FENNEL SEED. PINK PerUVIAN SALT.

FRENCH TOAST IS ONE OF THOSE COMFORT FOODS I SIMPLY CANNOT LIVE WITHOUT. MAYBE ITS THE CRISPY EDGES OR THE SALTY BUTTER  OR THE SWEET MAPLE OR MAYBE ITS A COMBINATION OF ALL THESE THINGS TOGETHER. EITHER WAY, IT HAS BEEN A SOLID FAVORITE SINCE CHILDHOOD. GONE IS THE WHITE BREAD OF THAT YOUTH, IT HAS BEEN REPLACED WITH A CHEWIER SOURDOUGH, A LITTLE FENNEL, A LITTLE ROSE AND A HIT OF PINK PERUVIAN SALT. IT IS A PRETTY GROWN UP VERSION OF MY CHILDHOOD CLASSIC.

XX

FRENCH TOAST. ROSE PETAL. FENNEL SEED. PINK PERUVIAN SALT.

MAKES 6 PIECES 

2 EGGS

1/ 2 CUP WHOLE MILK ( ANY MILK WILL WORK. I USE WHOLE MILK OR COCONUT MILK)

1 TEASPOON  LUCKNOW FENNEL SEED ( A SWEETER GREEN INDIAN FENNEL SEED)

1 TABLESPOON CRUSHED  DRIED ROSE PETALS ( RESERVE HALF FOR GARNISH ON FINISHED FRENCH TOAST)

1/4 TEASPOON PINK PERUVIAN SEA SALT

6 SLICES OF MIICHE SOUR DOUGH BREAD ( I USED SHE WOLF BAKERY BREAD BUT YOU CAN USE ANY DENSE SOUR DOUGH)

4 TABLESPOONS BUTTER ( RESEVER TWO FOR FINISHED FRENCH TOAST)

1 TABLESPOON OF COCONUT OIL

1/2 CUP MAPLE SYRUP WARMED

 

 

DIRECTIONS

IN A SMALL BOWL COMBINE EGGS, MILK, FENNEL SEED AND ROSE PETALS

WHISK UNTIL COMBINED

TRANSFER THE MIXTURE TO A SHALLOW BOWL

SOAK THE BREAD SLICES INDIVIDUALLY UNTIL COATED AND SOFT

DRAIN THE EXCESS EGG FROM THE BREAD AND SET ASIDE ON A PLATE

 

IN A 10 INCH CAST IRON SKILLET OVER MEDIUM HEAT TWO TABLESPOON OF UNSALTED BUTTER AND 1 TABLESPOON OF COCONUT OIL

 

FRY THE BREAD TWO PIECES AT A TIME UNTIL GOLDEN BROWN. FLIP TO BROWN EACH SIDE.

SERVE WITH SOFTENED BUTTER AND THE REMAINING CRUSHED ROSEHIPS

SPRINKLE WITH PINK PERUVIAN SEA SALT

 

 TOP WITH WARMED MAPLE SYRUP.

 

 

XX

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Yogurt with Seeds. Passion Fruit. Pistachios. Manuka Honey and Black Salt

Yogurt with Seeds. Passion Fruit. Pistachios. Chilies. Manuka Honey and Black Salt

Passion fruit is my go to winter fruit to make me feel as though I am someplace tropical.

2 1/2 cups Greek Yogurt

1 whole passion fruit, halved. Scoop out the fruit>

1/2 cup mixed seeds—Sunflower and Pepitos 1 tbsp. 

1/2 cup chopped Pistachios

4 tbsp. Manuka Honey 

1 tablespoon coconut oil

In a cast iron pan over low heat, toss the seeds in 1 tablespoon of coconut oill and a pinch each of crushed chili flakes and kosher salt. 

Divide the yogurt between 2 bowls
Scoop 1/2 of the passion fruit into each bowl. 

Top with the warmed seeds, pistachios, and drizzle with Manuka honey. Finish with the lightest hint of Black Crete Sea salt. 

Serves 2

winter's bone. bone both with horseradish. fermented black garlic and persian lime.

Here on the East Coast, we are the midst of our first winter storm of 2016. Nothing feels better on a snowy day than a good bowl of hot broth or anytime for that matter. I make mine in big batches and freeze it so it can be ready for the next storm! Below is a recipe I developed for Toast UK. It is a rich dark beef bone broth with hits of horseradish and smokey fermented garlic and just a touch of Persian lime. Enjoy wherever you are! xx

 

WINTER'S BONE. BONE BOTH WITH HORSERADISH. FERMENTED BLACK GARLIC AND PERSIAN LIME.

 

 

 

 

3 lbs. of Beef shin bones

3 lbs. meaty bones such as beef shank or short ribs

2 tablespoons Sicilian oregano

2 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil

Preheat oven to 400

 

Place bones on a large roasting tray

Sprinkle with Sicilian oregano

Generously salt the bones

Drizzle with olive oil

Roast bones for 1 hour turning midway through.

Remove bones from oven and cool.

 

When the bones are cooled, place in a large stock pot. I used a 7 quart Staub pot.

Add remaining ingredients

2 medium yellow onions, halved with skins on

4 whole heads black fermented garlic

2 whole heads garlic

2 whole Persian limes

2 cups chopped horseradish

1 celery root quartered

1 parsley root quartered

1 bundle of aromatics like thyme and parsley

1/4 cup juniper vinegar or apple cider vinegar

2 tbsp. kosher salt

20 cups filtered water

Add the water and allow the stock to come to a rapid boil, then lower heat to a bare simmer for 12-24 hours.

(don’t be afraid to add more water along the way if need be.)

Discard bones and other large debris and pour through a fine mesh strainer or a colander lined with cheesecloth.

makes 10-12 cups

Add salt to taste.

images ©Andrea Gentl/Gentl and Hyers 2015

 recipes ©Hungry Ghost 2015

EXPOLORING THE Q'EROS NATION OF PERU APRIL. 2-10 2016 REGISTRATION THE FIRST WEEK OF FEBRUARY 2016

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EXPLORING THE Q'EROS NATION OF PERU APRIL 2-10 2016 REGISTRATION THE FIRST WEEK OF FEBRUARY 2016

 

 

We’re launching our new workshop series, This is The Wanderlust, in the Andes Mountains of Peru! We’ll trek to the indigenous Q’eros Nation in collaboration with Hannah Rae Porst of Willka Yachay from April 2 to April 10. The Q’eros people are the wisdom keepers of the Andes. They are subsistence alpaca herders, potato farmers, weavers and musicians who live among the clouds in remote villages at 14,500 feet in the snow-capped Cordillera Vilcanota range, the highest mountain chain in Southeastern Peru. Considered to be the last Inkan community, the Q’eros strive to preserve their indigenous ethnic identity.

We’ll start our journey in Cusco, meeting at a beautiful colonial Bed and Breakfast to acclimate and introduce ourselves to one another before an evening meal. The next morning we’ll visit the markets, the bohemian art district and the spiritual center of the Inkan Empire. After a day of exploring, photographing and accustoming ourselves to the altitude and the sheer exuberance of the place, we’ll hit the streets for an evening photo demonstration. Cusco is luminous. We leave for Q’eros after breakfast. It’s a demanding, astounding and exhilarating journey. We’ll photograph along the way before stopping in a small village at the foot of sacred mountain Ausangate, where we’ll meet and photograph local weavers and participate in a Despacho offering by an Andean paqo. We’ll show you how to work with available light and a few improvised tools for location shooting and travel photography. We will take an early evening visit to local hot springs where you’ll have a chance to relax before an evening lecture and watching cloudscapes.

After leaving Apu Ausangate we ultimately make our way, led on horseback, to the remote hamlets of Q’eros, where we’ll stay with local villagers in cozy stone huts with thatched roofs. We’ll sleep on earth floors covered by llama and alpaca pelts, far removed from modern day amenities. One night we’ll camp out under the deep Peruvian night sky and try our hand at photographing more stars than we’ve ever seen before. Q’eros guides, cooks, wranglers and families will smooth our way, and share their lives and love.

Other photographic opportunities over the course of our time in the villages will include: trout fishing with nets, alpaca herding and shearing, a natural plant dye workshop, weaving demonstrations, earth oven cooking, gathering native medicinal plants, coca leaf readings, optional visits to Andean Paqo healers, and portrait photography with home visit families. We will also photograph hat making artisans and an intimate textile market where Peruvian weavers come together in the fields to display and sell their timeless work. This workshop will be a combination of photographic demonstrations as well as shooting with us side by side. We will teach a hands on holistic approach to travel photography, covering still life, reportage, landscape and portraiture. We will immerse ourselves in the culture of the mountains by connecting to the people as well as sharing creatively and learning with one another.

This workshop will be a creative reboot for those with a strong sense of adventure. This is a land of footpaths, far removed from the world as you know it. Lack of internet, roads and outside communication will only enhance our experience.

Workshop registration will be announced February 1st, 2016. This workshop is limited to 12 participants. Please see below to put your name on a mailing list to receive the announcement via email.

Most dietary preferences can be accommodated by our local cooks.

Hannah Rae Porst

Hannah Rae Porst, founder and director of Willka Yachay, has been living in Cusco and working with the indigenous people of the Q’eros Nation for five years. She founded Willka Yachay (Quechua for sacred knowledge) to develop education that enables young Q’eros to know their history and rights, preserve their culture and language, and develop their communities sustainably. Hannah has been leading mountain expeditions to Q’eros since 2012. She is a graduate of Bates College. @hannitarae

Willka Yachay

Willka Yachay is a nonprofit organization dedicated to helping indigenous communities thrive in the modern world. We are empowering the next generation of the indigenous Q’eros Nation of Peru to become leaders who elevate their standard of living, guide their community toward sustainable modernity and revitalize their cultural identity. Together with the Q'eros, Willka Yachay builds and sustains culturally and ecologically based schools high in the Andes. Willka Yachay currently supports nine schools: three pre-k, four primary schools, one high school and one adult school. Willka Yachay collaborates with Q’eros parents and elders, acts as a school system administrator, creates and coordinates curriculum development, hires and supports culturally sensitive teachers, provides all supplies, nutritious food and educational national and international field trips. Willka Yachay also implements solar light, music and cultural preservation, food security, and mother and infant care projects, as well as the first health center and weaving cooperative in the Q’eros Nation.   

www.willkayachay.org, @willkayachay

WORKSHOP PRICE 5000 USD

THIS WORKSHOP WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE THE FIRST WEEK OF FEBRUARY 2016. IT IS CAPPED AT 12 PARTICIPANTS. ALL LODGING, MEALS, DEMONSTRATIONS AND GUIDES ARE INCLUDED, WITH THE EXCEPTION OF AN OPTIONAL SESSION WITH AN ANDEAN PAQO HEALER AND TRAVEL INSURANCE. AIRFARE TO AND FROM LIMA AND CUSCO IS NOT INCLUDED. FULL PAYMENT IS REQUIRED FOR THIS CLASS TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT. THIS WORKSHOP IS NON REFUNDABLE.

THERE IS A THREE DAY MACHU + PICCHU SACRED VALLEY EXTENSION WITH HANNAH RAE PORST APRIL. 10-13 COST + 1400 USD PARTICIPANTS INTERESTED IN THE 3 DAY EXTENSION CAN EMAIL HANNAH DIRECTLY AT hannah@willkayachay.org

 DUE TO THE REMOTE NATURE OF THIS WORKSHOP WE STRONGLY RECOMMEND THEAT EACH PARTICIPANT OBTAIN THIER OWN TRAVELER'S INSURANCE.  FURTHER INFORMATION ON TRAVEL INSURANCE WILL BE IN THE INTRODUCTORY PACKAGE. ALL PARTICIPANTS WILL BE ASKED TO SIGN A LIABILITY WAIVER.

THIS WORKSHOP WILL BE AVAILABLE FOR PURCHASE THE FIRST WEEK OF FEBRUARY 2015

We are pleased to announce our upcoming photographic workshop in Andean Mountains of Peru through our newly launched workshop series This Is The Wanderlust in collaboration with Hannah Rae Porst of the Willka Yachay Organization in the beautiful Q’eros Valley. The expedition will take place2-10 April 2016.

 

ABOUT THE Q'EROS

The Q’eros people are the wisdom keepers of the Andes. They are subsistence alpaca herders, potato farmers, weavers and musicians who live among the clouds in remote villages at 14,500 feet in the snow-capped Cordillera Vilcanota range, the highest mountain chain in southeastern Peru.Considered to be the last Inkan community, the Q’eros strive to preserve their indigenous ethnic identity. Q’eros live a hardworking life at one with nature. They perform offerings to Pacha Mama, Mother Earth, and to the Apus, mountain spirits. Worldview concepts of ayni, the importance of reciprocal sharing, and animu, awareness of an animated essence in all things, shape their interactions with each other and their environment. Those who are invited to travel to their out-of-this world beautiful valley and meet them carry luminous images home.

THE JOURNEY

 We will start our journey in Cusco, meeting at our Colonial Bed and Breakfast to acclimate and introduce ourselves to one another before the evening meal.The next morning we will explore the markets, the bohemian art district and the spiritual center of the Incan Empire. After a day ofexploring, photographing and acclimatizing we will hit the streets for an evening photo demonstration. The next morning after breakfast, we will make our way towards Q’eros, photographing along the way before stopping for the night in a small village at the foot of the sacred mountain Ausangate where will we participate in a Despacho offering and visit and photograph local weavers. We will show you how to work with available light and a few improvised tools for location shooting and travel photography. We will take an early evening visit to local hot springs where you will have a chance to relax before an evening lecture.

After leaving the sacred mountain we will make our way, led on horseback, to the remote hamlets of Q’eros, where workshop participants will pair off to have home stays will local villagers in centuries old cozy homes. You will sleep on the earthen floor on llama and Alpaca Pelts far removed form modern day amenities. We will camp out all together one evening under the vast Peruvian night sky and try our hand at photographing the stars. Other photographic opportunities over the course of the next few days will include: trout fishing with nets,natural plant dye workshop, alpaca herding and shearing, earth oven cooking, optional visit to Andean Paqo healer, portrait photography with home visit families and gathering native medicinal plants. We will photograph hat making and artisans and a visit to an intimate textile market where Peruvian families come together in the open fields for you to peruse and purchase their beautiful work.

This workshop will be a combination of photographic demonstrations as well as shooting with us side by side. We will teach a hands on holistic approach to travel photography, covering still life, reportage, landscape and portraiture. We will immerse ourselves in the culture of the mountains by connecting to the people as well as sharing creatively and learning with one another.

 

This workshop will be a creative reboot for those with a strong sense of adventure.This is a land of footpaths, far removed form the world as you know it. Lack of internet, roads and outside communication will only enhance our experience. 

Workshop registration will be announced February,1st. 2015. This workshop is limited to 12 participants.  Please visit www.thisisthewanderlust.com to subscribe and get your name on a mailing list to receive the announcement via email.

 

*Dietary restrictions can be accommodated by our local cooks. 

winter chicken soup. turmeric. spruce.citrus. ginger.magic soup.

When the new year rolls around. I am ready to eat a little cleaner. The holidays are inevitably debaucherous and while I love it and fully partake, this year I felt more than ever the need to start the year off a little lighter. I cut out wheat, dairy, sugar, caffeine and alcohol, you might ask what else is there? I asked myself that too but after ten days at this I am pleasantly surprised that I don't feel deprived at all, well, almost at all! I will admit to missing cheese. Pecorino is my Kryptonite.

 

I was recently asked to develop some recipes for Toast, one of my favorite UK companies for their blog Toast Travels. I decided to go with a warming chicken soup. I make bone broths and stocks on a regular basis and always have, maybe it came out of a  moderately Hippy upbringing along with growing up in a New England waste not want not family or perhaps it's my Southern Italian Grandmother, who like the New Englander's, carried that same credo. At any rate, no chicken carcass goes unused in this house ever! What I love most about soups and broths is that they are so damn easy and adaptable. They are most forgiving as you can add a little more of this and a little less of that and put your own twist on it. Soup is magic, and I have been playing at making soup since I first heard the folk tale Stone Soupas a child . When you give a kid a pot and a wooden spoon to play with they generally tell you they are making soup.  They do so with big sweeping gestures of the wooden spoon turning 'round in the pot andthey do so as they collect everything but the kitchen sink and throw it all into their make believe soup. As adults, we do the the same. Soup is a food we more often than not associate with comfort and childhood and home and a little bit of magic.

This one is a twist on a classic chicken soup,with copious hits of ginger, sumac, winter citrus, spruce, turmeric and chili. It is a powerful soup and will warm you to you bones.

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Chicken Soup with Citrus SpruceTurmeric and Ginger

 

This soup is a bright healing broth with notes of citrus and ginger.

Clean roasted chicken carcass, reserving any meat to add to the finished stock.

 

In 7 quart pot, place all the following ingredients:

 

1 carcass of a large roasting chicken.

3 whole heads of garlic skin on

1 whole yellow onion halved. skin on

1 red onion, halved with skin on 

3 cups coarsely chopped ginger

1 teaspoon Aleppo pepper

2 tablespoons kosher salt

5 cups chopped celery (leaves and stems)

3 large carrots cut into 1 inch pieces

1 cup coarsely chopped fresh turmeric

1/2 lemon

1 satsuma orange halved

2 1/2 cups chopped parsley

1 bunch fresh thyme

2 small whole chilies

1 teaspoon sumac

1 cup loosely packed spruce

 

20 cups filtered water

 

Set to simmer on medium heat. When the stock comes to a boil, lower the heat and leave in on a bare simmer for 7 hours.

Add more water if need be.

 

Discard the debris and strain through a fine mesh strainer or a colander lined with cheesecloth.

 

Add pieces of roasted chicken and fresh celery if you wish.

 

Makes 10 cups broth.

 

images ©Andrea Gentl/Gentl and Hyers 2015

 recipes ©Hungry Ghostl 2015

lens and larder collaboration in the wilds of connemara ireland.

We just returned from Ireland where we put on a visual storytelling and classic european still life workshop at the beautiful Ballynahinch Castle in Connemara Ireland. We focused on the terroir of Connemara and shot everything from  foraged seaweed to locally caught game birds to the honey man. Our final day we set a banquet of roast lamb and oysters and local cheeses. Thank you to our gorgeous and organized hosts Imen McDonnell from Farmette and Cliodhna Prendergast from Breaking Eggs and to Susan Spungen our food stylist and partner in crime and to all our students who traveled near and far to attend. It was a whirlwind of information and activity. Special thanks to Claire Davey from America Village Galway for sharing with us her incredible tinctures and teas and her beautiful meditation in the woods and for plying our spirits with her wild cocktails. Thank you to Gerard Coyne of Connemara Bee Keepers and to John Malone of Malone's Butchers in Clifden and to Shane Bisgood , Chief instructor of the Connemara Shooting School, for letting the students "shoot" him! Trish Deseine I was blown away by by your new book Home on Irish Home cooking and Helen James it was  so great  to catch up after all this time!  Thank you to Aran Sweaters and 31Chapel Lane for the lovely gifts four our students! We left with more than we came with. Not the least the good friends we made along the way. We feel our adventures with out Irish friends have just begun. A huge thank you to Patrick O'Flaherty of Ballynahinch Castle. We know we trashed the place and you  and your amazing staff were ever so gracious about it! You kept us entertained and feeling at home. xx

 

 

We wanted to share a few photos from the two day workshop. 

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the perfect palette.

 Above; featured colors of Ralph Lauren Paint include; Pasha Pink, Istanbul, Sea Orange, Black Watch Navy, Hotel Du Cap, and Chamois. Choose your own palette from over 1000 different colors and many different finishes.

 

 

Yesterday I took part in a really interesting discussion about photography, design, color and visual story telling, it took place at the Bon Appetit kitchen in One World Trade, here in New York City. The event was a partnership with Local Creative Brooklyn, Bon Appétit and Ralph Lauren Paints.

The idea, was to bring together a group of creatives from across many disciplines, to spark a conversation on a bright day in a beautifully curated space, where every detail was considered. A perfect palette of color was chosen by the Bon Appétit  team from the deck of Ralph Lauren Paints. Color swatches in hand, they set to making beautiful food and cocktails inspired by these colors. A beautiful table was set with plates and napkins and glasses that played off the chosen palette. Taylor Patterson, the brilliant and artful mind behind Fox Fodder Farm chose flowers and botanicals to create stunning arrangements inspired by the same dictated palette. Her gorgeous flowers were both muted and bright all at once. 

After a brief frenzy of instagram and iPhone snapping we sat down to lunch and broke off into groups to chat about aesthetics, color and trends. At our end of the table we spoke about what is visually over used in this maker driven culture. What are things we are seeing too often via social platforms? What are the new trends? Where will be five years from now and does the new generation of 18 year olds care about finding the perfect spoon or bowl? Someone at our end of table referenced a philosopher, and she sort of summed up our thoughts on the day. In her book,  On Beauty And Being Just,  philosopher Elaine Scary discusses the nature of beauty. She argues that beauty begets beauty and it constantly provokes copies of itself. We came to the conclusion together that beauty does beget beauty and it definitely churns the wheel of repetition. In this overly saturated image driven age every photo that is taken and put out there for our viewing has an agenda in the visual realm. Nothing is without purpose or motive.

We talked briefly about styling tips yesterday and how to see light and color. What makes a good photograph?

A good photographis all about light and color. 

For me color is mutable, What looks grey one day can be white the next or even green or blue depending on the kind of light that fall across it and the time of day. Inspiration for me has always comes from traveling, a big part of that inspiration is color. I find that I like to bring brighter colors into my work after traveling. New York is a muted city, and while I find beauty here I don’t find intensity of color.  Mexico City, India and Bhutan were all places of great color and light inspiration. The light in these countries is sharp and direct and the colors are almost oversaturated, pairings of neon pink and yellow are not unheard of, orange and blue mixed with patterns and black, always black.

The colors used in yesterdays collaboration were soft and bit desaturated,  a little dusty like an old plaster wall with stories to tell. As New Yorkers we probably play it pretty safe with color, black is our uniform after all.  We have to remind ourselves of the world of color and shade and tone that is out there.

 

 On the color front, the Bon Appétit team brilliantly paired the Ralph Lauren Paints colors with food and styling. Pasha Pink became  Crisp and Co. Pinot Noir Pickled beets, Sea Orange became Empire Mayonnaise Sriracha, Istanbul was Bees Knees Spicy Honey, Chamois, The Chili Lab “The Grove Blend” Chili Butter, Black Watch Navy, APPRVL Napkin Set, Hotel Du Cap, Suite One Studio salt dish.

After lunch we were encouraged to “paint” a donut or a petit fours with the same colors that played throughout the day, and then we ate them and they were delicious.

I was asked to create a photograph that was my take on the day. I started to document the scene and the people at the event but then I kept coming back to Taylor’s florals. They encompassed everything that we talked about throughout the day. She works with color much like a painter, the hues of Pasha Pink and Istanbul washed across the marigolds in varying intensities. I decided to deconstruct one of her arrangements in an effort to peel it back to color, form. In doing so I created my own unique take on the day, my visual storytelling became about deconstruction and emotion.

 

The perfect palette is vibe, it can be anything you want it to be. you only need to “see” it.

 

Ralph Lauren Paints are available at Home Depot.