lens and larder collaboration in the wilds of connemara ireland.

We just returned from Ireland where we put on a visual storytelling and classic european still life workshop at the beautiful Ballynahinch Castle in Connemara Ireland. We focused on the terroir of Connemara and shot everything from  foraged seaweed to locally caught game birds to the honey man. Our final day we set a banquet of roast lamb and oysters and local cheeses. Thank you to our gorgeous and organized hosts Imen McDonnell from Farmette and Cliodhna Prendergast from Breaking Eggs and to Susan Spungen our food stylist and partner in crime and to all our students who traveled near and far to attend. It was a whirlwind of information and activity. Special thanks to Claire Davey from America Village Galway for sharing with us her incredible tinctures and teas and her beautiful meditation in the woods and for plying our spirits with her wild cocktails. Thank you to Gerard Coyne of Connemara Bee Keepers and to John Malone of Malone's Butchers in Clifden and to Shane Bisgood , Chief instructor of the Connemara Shooting School, for letting the students "shoot" him! Trish Deseine I was blown away by by your new book Home on Irish Home cooking and Helen James it was  so great  to catch up after all this time!  Thank you to Aran Sweaters and 31Chapel Lane for the lovely gifts four our students! We left with more than we came with. Not the least the good friends we made along the way. We feel our adventures with out Irish friends have just begun. A huge thank you to Patrick O'Flaherty of Ballynahinch Castle. We know we trashed the place and you  and your amazing staff were ever so gracious about it! You kept us entertained and feeling at home. xx



We wanted to share a few photos from the two day workshop. 


the perfect palette.

 Above; featured colors of Ralph Lauren Paint include; Pasha Pink, Istanbul, Sea Orange, Black Watch Navy, Hotel Du Cap, and Chamois. Choose your own palette from over 1000 different colors and many different finishes.



Yesterday I took part in a really interesting discussion about photography, design, color and visual story telling, it took place at the Bon Appetit kitchen in One World Trade, here in New York City. The event was a partnership with Local Creative Brooklyn, Bon Appétit and Ralph Lauren Paints.

The idea, was to bring together a group of creatives from across many disciplines, to spark a conversation on a bright day in a beautifully curated space, where every detail was considered. A perfect palette of color was chosen by the Bon Appétit  team from the deck of Ralph Lauren Paints. Color swatches in hand, they set to making beautiful food and cocktails inspired by these colors. A beautiful table was set with plates and napkins and glasses that played off the chosen palette. Taylor Patterson, the brilliant and artful mind behind Fox Fodder Farm chose flowers and botanicals to create stunning arrangements inspired by the same dictated palette. Her gorgeous flowers were both muted and bright all at once. 

After a brief frenzy of instagram and iPhone snapping we sat down to lunch and broke off into groups to chat about aesthetics, color and trends. At our end of the table we spoke about what is visually over used in this maker driven culture. What are things we are seeing too often via social platforms? What are the new trends? Where will be five years from now and does the new generation of 18 year olds care about finding the perfect spoon or bowl? Someone at our end of table referenced a philosopher, and she sort of summed up our thoughts on the day. In her book,  On Beauty And Being Just,  philosopher Elaine Scary discusses the nature of beauty. She argues that beauty begets beauty and it constantly provokes copies of itself. We came to the conclusion together that beauty does beget beauty and it definitely churns the wheel of repetition. In this overly saturated image driven age every photo that is taken and put out there for our viewing has an agenda in the visual realm. Nothing is without purpose or motive.

We talked briefly about styling tips yesterday and how to see light and color. What makes a good photograph?

A good photographis all about light and color. 

For me color is mutable, What looks grey one day can be white the next or even green or blue depending on the kind of light that fall across it and the time of day. Inspiration for me has always comes from traveling, a big part of that inspiration is color. I find that I like to bring brighter colors into my work after traveling. New York is a muted city, and while I find beauty here I don’t find intensity of color.  Mexico City, India and Bhutan were all places of great color and light inspiration. The light in these countries is sharp and direct and the colors are almost oversaturated, pairings of neon pink and yellow are not unheard of, orange and blue mixed with patterns and black, always black.

The colors used in yesterdays collaboration were soft and bit desaturated,  a little dusty like an old plaster wall with stories to tell. As New Yorkers we probably play it pretty safe with color, black is our uniform after all.  We have to remind ourselves of the world of color and shade and tone that is out there.


 On the color front, the Bon Appétit team brilliantly paired the Ralph Lauren Paints colors with food and styling. Pasha Pink became  Crisp and Co. Pinot Noir Pickled beets, Sea Orange became Empire Mayonnaise Sriracha, Istanbul was Bees Knees Spicy Honey, Chamois, The Chili Lab “The Grove Blend” Chili Butter, Black Watch Navy, APPRVL Napkin Set, Hotel Du Cap, Suite One Studio salt dish.

After lunch we were encouraged to “paint” a donut or a petit fours with the same colors that played throughout the day, and then we ate them and they were delicious.

I was asked to create a photograph that was my take on the day. I started to document the scene and the people at the event but then I kept coming back to Taylor’s florals. They encompassed everything that we talked about throughout the day. She works with color much like a painter, the hues of Pasha Pink and Istanbul washed across the marigolds in varying intensities. I decided to deconstruct one of her arrangements in an effort to peel it back to color, form. In doing so I created my own unique take on the day, my visual storytelling became about deconstruction and emotion.


The perfect palette is vibe, it can be anything you want it to be. you only need to “see” it.


Ralph Lauren Paints are available at Home Depot.


A few weeks ago we headed to Lummi  Island off the coast of Seattle to teach a photography workshop. The premise was visual storytelling and reportage with a heavy dose of wild and gathered ingredients as our base for inspiration.It was our first workshop and we thank all those involved for their patience and inspiration. it was a lovely weekend, with students from the United States, Portugal and Dubai! It was completely pulled together and organized by Aran Goyoaga of Cannelle and Vanille. The spark to this this idea started a couple years ago  with a quick conversation with Aran and the timing finally seemed right!The stars aligned with all our schedules and we forged ahead. Aran was the perfect co-partner and host! She and local Seattle based photographer Charity Burgraff kept us well fed and all the pieces moving in unison. ( look for Charity's new book  Sea and Smoke a collaboration with Chef Blaine Wetzel of The Willows Inn out this October, it is gorgeous and SO very inspiring!) Charity thank you for so graciously sharing the island with us!

We were't sure what we would find for wild foods once we got to Lummi but luckily it was bountiful. We gathered rose hips and roses and herbs for the weekend from Riley Stark's Nettles Farm where some of the students stayed. He had one of the most fragrant and wild gardens I have been to in quite some time! there was something extraordinary about the way the scents hung in the crisp salty air. Riley's farm and all it's beauty will stay with us for some time. a day or so into the workshop we started brainstorming dinner plans and realized we could grab a couple chickens  from Riley who raises the most beautiful organic Poulet Bleu. We added some wild oregano, whole quince thyme, rose hips, fennel blossom, olives, and local salt from Jim Henken's shop Marine Area7 and voila, dinner was born. the chickens were braised then finished off in the oven.


Everything we made to eat that weekend was in some way seasoned with things we gathered from Jim's farm. We had a huge basket of gathered edibles that we kept returning to for a little snip of this or that.My favorite seasonings of the weekend were the fennel blossom, the wild oregano and the celery seed. we there together a salad on our last night that was mediterranean inspired but whole from the island.we used Riley's organic perfectly ripe tomatoes, thinly sliced onions from the farm, whole large caper berries,  crushed green olives, fennel blossom, celery seed,  wild purple oregano and blossom,local sea salt, a good dose of cold pressed super green olive oil, wild mint and tiny bit of wild mustard blossom.


I will try to recreate it soon and post a recipe. It was one of my favorite salads of summer.


The workshop itself was held at the beautiful Lummi Island home of Seattle based Photographer and shop keeper (Marine Area7). Thank you Jim for letting us take over your very special space! Jim not only went crabbing for us once but twice! We were really spoiled with those dinners!

Jim's house is filled with luminous light and as you can imagine being the proprietor of the new Seattle based shop Marine Area 7 it was filled with props and surfaces that were spot on. I was coveting my share of goods for sure! Jim, I am still dreaming about that smoked salmon you made so effortlessly in that beautiful smoker! If you haven’t checked out his shop which he runs with his wife you must do so!


We met up on our last day with Rob Gold, sous at the Willows Inn to do a little woods and beach gathering. We found black berries, sorrel, pine, German Chamomile, Rose hips and so much more! On the beach we gathered sea lettuces for our poached egg dish. We quickly blanched the seaweed and added pea blossoms mustard flower and dill and fennel fronds and put an egg on it, hit it with a drizzle of olive oil and some pine salt and breakfast was done. thank you Rob for letting us point all this e cameras at you!

At night we snuck away to The Willows where we drank dark  smokey house roasted tea and had amazing wine and local cheese. Next time We will return for a proper stay there! Thank you Blaine!

We left the island full, happy and exhausted! So glad to have met all of you involved. Keep pushing yourselves!





Tammy at Running with Tweezers pulled together the list below if everyone's work sites!

Thank you Tammy! I snagged it from your post. Check out everyone's work when you get a moment.

And huge thank you to Monique Baron photographer and assistant/tech extradorniaire for  filleting salmon and pulling together power points and for the Capture One tutorial.


Below are a few of our favorite moments.




150910_LUMMI_ISLAND_Card1-160 1.jpg



My thoughts on Mexico City were terribly outdated.  I thought of it only as a gritty, polluted and dangerous city. I couldn’t have been more wrong. Though it was virtually impossible to ignore the buzz these past few years, especially living and working in New York,  I had remained a skeptic.

What changed? I spent a lot of time in Mexico last year working on various projects and it seemed all roads led to Mexico City.  Everywhere I went, people were talking about the food, the culture, the art galleries, the hotels and the architecture. This city of 19 million actually has more in common with New York and Paris and Istanbul than any place it may have been formerly compared to and there is no doubt that it is having a moment. 


Last month I headed down there with my friend chef Camille Becerra to see what it was all about.


We left New York on the red eye out of JFK at 1am on one of the hottest nights of this New York summer on Aeromexico. We arrived in the D.F just four short hours later ready to take the city by storm.  We were pretty much up for anything and wanted to taste and see everything. Armed with a massive list culled from friends we set to task. Our first stop was the super cute Stella Bed and Breakfast where we were met by Sylvia who graciously fed us a beautiful breakfast of fried eggs and tortillas while the light slowly came up in the Roma neighborhood where we were staying. Needless to say, in the days that followed, we ate our way all around town, meeting up with some local food writers, stylists and bloggers.

The way I normally travel is to first do a bit of preliminary research myself, then I speak with friends and friends of friends and begin to cull a list.


I use Foursquare when I travel to keep track of the places I have been, to make and edit lists and to share them with others easily. I find it is a great starting point to my general list. I follow a few of my well traveled friends and we are always sharing and updating through Foursquare. If you are not onto it yet for travel, I highly recommend it.


Below is list of a few of our favorite spots. This makes for one long beautiful eating day! Do not miss these! 


Breakfast at La Fonda Marguerita



For Breakfast, La Fonda Marguerita. It is important to remember that breakfast and lunch are traditionally the main meals of the day in Mexico. So f you are thinking of saving some amazing little taco spot you read about for late afternoon or an evening meal, check first that it is open! We missed a few places before we got hip to this idea.

La Fonda Margarita was recommended by a friend who lives in Mexico City. It is a tiny local spot where they cook most of the night. They open the doors really early, maybe even as early as 5am. though I would call to check on that because time is a bit slow in Mexico. They cook  solely over charcoal, giant giant pots of bubbling goodness, many hands taking turns to stir. We went at 8am and just missed the line and the rush that followed. What did we eat?   We ate Copious bowls full of stewed pork,  simmered for hours over the fire.  We were drawn right away to the pork in  salsa verde and   to another dish of chicharron stewed with tomatoes and chilies, after which came the  most perfectly fried eggs, atop delicious homemade tortillas. Coffee is served hot and sweet and black.

If I could have, I would have eaten every breakfast here. It is great place to go before heading out to the morning markets.


 Adolfo Prieto 1364, Benito Juárez, Tlacoquemecatl del Valle, 03100 Ciudad de México, D.F., Mexico

+52 55 5559 6358



Mid morning coffee at Rosetta Panaderia

Delicious coffee and absolute best Guava pastry. I am kind of a Guava freak. I had them at many places including Ideal but Rosetta Panaderia was the best.

Same owners as the Rosetta restaurant nearby.


Calle Havre #73, Cuauhtemoc, Juárez, 06600 Ciudad de México, D.F., Mexico
+52 55 5207 7065


Lunch at Contramar

A long luxurious lunch at Contramar that turns into late afternoon day drinking, is often recommended by highly trustworthy people. .You will find this place on 99 percent of the must do's of Mexico City. We had a short lunch only because we weren't feeling it. We didn't love it, it felt really "New York" and that isn't what I look for when I travel. It is like going to Paris and only searching for "Tres Brooklyn" Many people are looking for familiarity and comfort when they travel, so if that is you, then why not? It is a fabulous spot for people watching and the tuna tostadas are highly recommended and they are said the copied around Mexico City. Personally, I felt they lacked any depth. Judge for yourself and report back.


Delegación Cuauhtémoc C.P. 06700. México D.F.. RESERVACIONES 55 5514 9217 · 55 5514 3169


Sunset drink on the rooftop of Hotel Condesa D.F

Take a late afternoon stroll around the Condesa Neighborhood, one of the D F.'s hippest area's. Stop into the Hotel Condesa and head straight to the rooftop for a sunset cocktail. I highly recommend the Hibiscus Margarita with Hibiscus salt. Found around on the plush cushions and watch the lights come on over this low flat city.


Dinner at  Quntoni


Quintonil is all about beautifully presented, thoughtful, modern Mexican food.  The flavor combinations are new and exciting. They are well known for their cactus ceviche. It was perfect and swimming in the most delicious herby green broth. The portions are not big. We mostly ordered seafood and it was super fresh.  Order a few things to share. The service was excellent. Oh, and the house cocktail... Mescal and worm salt. YES! THANK YOU.

reservations are a must.


 Newton 55, Polanco, 11560 Federal District, Mexico

+52 55 5280 1660



Late night post mescal bar tacos at Los Parados.

This is an absolute.

First a few words about the Mescal bars. You must experienceat least one. Mescal is an essential part of the experience.


Bosforo Mezcaleria


Bosforo, located in the historic city center is a tiny hole in the wall place. Try many different wild sourced mescals.

Tiny bites available. The night we were at Bosforo there was a small gathering of Mescal makers there to talk about their work. I learned a lot even though the lecture was in Spanish! Thank god I am visual person, have studied Italian, between this and photos, I got the gist. I honestly had no idea that some  Mescals are aged with rotten fruit and even raw chicken and sometimes turkey, rabbit or deer meat.This type of Mescal is called Pechuga. Some Wild  hunted agaves take as much as 25 years to grow. Who knew? I have much to learn here and I need to investigate this subject further. I tried Pechuga and it did have a distinctly different taste from the other Mescals, more funky for sure.


 Luis Moya, Cuauhtémoc, Centro, Ciudad de México, D.F., Mexico


La Clandestina in Roma Nord.


Small, great location over fifty different Mescals. All locally sourced from Oaxaca.

Av. Alvaro Obregón 298 (Sonora), 06100 Mexico City, Federal District, Mexico



Once you have sufficiently imbibed head to the late night taco stand called Los Parados.

Los Parados actually translates to "standing", there are no seats here at this swift shop where they move hundreds of tacos an hour. We were three people and we probably had at least 15! Tacos from Mexico City are not like their overstuffed American cousin. They are small and discreet but pack major flavor.

There are many kinds to choose from. There is a taco master at each station and they move swiftly. My suggestion is to go for one of each.


Los Parados

Monterrey 333 Col. Roma

06760 México, D.F.

+52 55 5264 7138

leave there sated and happy and grab a taxi or an uber, both easy to find and roll into bed.


Tomorrow will be another day and there is Casa Azul to see and the Frida and Diego Studios, there is a cocktail to be had at the Sant'Angel Inn and the Markets... so many Markets! Museums, Galleries and The Barrigan House. You will barely scratch the surface of this amazing city in a week.


Historic city center




Flower Market

Fruit along the exterior of the Flower Market

Rosetta Panaderia

Churros from The Roma Nord  specialty food Market

Flea Market finds

Shrine at Casa Azul

Luis Barragan House

Breakfast at Fonda Marguerita

Breakfast at Fonda Marguerita

Herbs and flowers at Mercado Sonora

Street Food stall at Mercado Sonora

Fruit at Mercado Coyoacan

Casa Luis Barragan

Overgrown garden at Casa Barragan

Ideal Panaderia

where the wild things are. dandelion butter. frittata of the things winter left behind.

By the time we got upstate this year summer was nearly around the corner. Though I have mentioned before that spring comes late to our side of the mountain, this winter was especially brutal. By memorial day, most but not all of the ramps were beginning to wither back. The dry spring had mostly eradicated the wild watercress along our various springs which are running feebly at best this year. I picked what I could that winter had been kind enough to leave behind, big piles of dandelion blossom, dandelion leaves, wild mustard greens, wild mustard flower, chives, spring garlic,  wild mint, sorrel and ramp leaves. I set the dandelion blossom aside for butter and washed the rest of the greens. I chopped the bulbs of spring garlic and mixed them into the greens. I put  a generous dose of olive oil on the bottom of a heavy large cast iron frying pan and then I  piled the greens on top. I whisked up a dozen eggs, their yolks a bright yellow, added about a half a cup of grated pecorino, a dash of celtic sea salt and a few turns of the pepper mill.


I poured the egg mixture over the greens and set on Julian’s mid heat Aga burner covered for ten minutes or so. I watched it carefully so the bottom would not burn. I am not super used to cooking with an Aga so it took a little extra watching and patience. When the eggs started to puff up around the greens it was time to remove the lid and transfer the frittata  to the oven. I hit the top with a dash of olive oil and some more freshly grated pecorino before placing it in the oven. I cooked it in the mid range temp oven until it was just golden abot ten more minutes. We served it room temperature. The key to a good frittata is a dozen eggs and copious amounts of olive oil. The frittata’s from Puglia, where my grandmother was from are made this way. What's not to love about olive oil?



Frittata Of The Things Winter Left Behind


12 organic eggs

Copious pile of wild greens such as dandelion, mint, mustard, sorrel,and spring garlic.

1/2 cup plus a bit more of a nice olive oil

1/2 cup plus more for grating of pecorino romano

Sea salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Large cast iron fry pan







Dandelion Butter


Start by collecting a bunch of dandelion blossoms.

Gently pull the petals away from the tiny bulb at the base of the neck.


1 cup of dandelion petals

1 qt. of organic heavy cream

1 cup of bright yellow dandelion petals.

teaspoon kosher salt


Combine the heavy cream and the dandelion petals to a small blender.( I find it hard to scrape the butter from a deep blender)

Pulse on high speed for two minutes or so until the solids start to slap the sides of the blender and clearly separate from the liquids.

Holding the butter in place tip the blender to drain off the excess liquids.

Pulse a few more times.

Remove the solids into a wooden bowl and the run ice cold water over the butter until it firms up a bit more.

With the back side of a wooden spoon work the butter back and forth against the side of the wooden bowl to remove any leftover liquids.

When done transfer to a container and serve.

The butter will keep it an airtight container in your fridge for a week or so.

I topped my butter with a sprinkle of pine tip salt.

Serve with homemade crackers or on a fresh pasta or your favorite bread.

I had it on she wolf bakery bread. heaven. sigh.






Where does the time go? Though winter was insufferably long in New York City this year, I look ahead now, and measure the days I have left with my baby girl. 

Whoa. College.

Where did that come from? I hope that we are sending her off into the world with adequate skills in which to survive and to be a compassionate human. I hope just as much, that she has inherited my passion for all things culinary. I think perhaps she may have, but time will tell. My plan to feed the teenagers was a good one I think. If you feed them they will flock to your house. Gone are the days now of those midnight roast chickens and flour-less chocolate cakes, when I would light the candles and set the table minutes before their boisterous arrival. Flushed and hungry from their new found freedom and long evenings rousting about the city, they ate ravenously. I am hoping she and her friends will carry on the tradition of gathering friends together to share a meal. I hope most of all, as they set off into the world, in every direction, like the seeds of  a dandelion, on the gustiest summer wind, that they return to my table from time to time.

Carpe Diem friends.


groundhog day celery leaf and herb salad.

So, it looks like we are in for another six weeks of winter. I can't believe the groundhog could see much of anything today. We are in the  midst of a total white out here in NYC.

When I don't want to leave the house on days like this, I scrounge around the fridge to see what I can come up with. I have been juicing a ton lately and am totally in love with my Breville Fountain Juicer. I was trolling the Bon App sight late one night and saw that they did a whole juicer comparison article and the Brebville was the winner. My late night purchases don't usually turn out quite so well but I have to say this one is a winner. Seventy- five percent of the people in my house are obsessed with it. (teenage son not so much: give it time) My favorite juice, as of late, is celery/ginger/apple/ kale/parsley and lemon. So today, for lunch, I turned to those same standbys for a fresh, herby salad.

There is really no recipe here. It is meant more as an inspiration.


Clean and set aside a good bunch of celery leaf, mint and parsley

Chop the greens coarsely; leave some celery leaf whole and toss in a bowl.

Dice one shallot. Toss in Bowl.

Dice two radishes. Toss in bowl with greens.

Add a teaspoon of salted capers. I like the ones from Pantelleria. Rinse well before adding.

Add a little lemon rind. Bergamot lemon is really nice.

Squeeze the juice of half a lemon over the greens.

Dress with a really good grassy extra virgin olive oil. 

Sprinkle with a nice flakey sea salt and cracked black pepper.

Toss to combine.

Throw a poached egg on top if you so desire or serve wit a nice rustic toast and a great shard of cheese.

Happy Ground Hog day.




120625_GH_NATURA_MORTA 1142.jpg

snow day. amy chaplin's brownies.

So, the snowpocolypse didn't really materialize here in NYC. I am a little disappointed. I was hoping for a record to breaking storm to rival the Blizzard of 1888. I love quiet unexpected days off.  in our house on these days, there is generally something bubbling on the stove and the house is warm and cozy. Everyone sleeps in and the city wakes up  so slowly. I haven't heard one horn today which for Broome street is a minor miracle.

Mid way through my editing today, I decided to take a break to bake something. I picked up Amy Chaplin's book At Home in the Whole Food Kitchen and flipped to the sweets. A couple weeks ago my friend Nancy snuck a few of Amy's vegan chocolate apricot almond cookies into the movies.They were pure heaven. So, I and no doubt that I would find something delicious to make from her book. I am a brownie maker since way way back It was one of the first things I was allowed  to make on my own. Page 444 of the Fannie Farmer Cookbook was thoroughly smeared with chocolate and butter and the fingerprints of four children.

These are not your mother's brownies. They are rich and soft and decadent with dark chocolate, maple, almond butter, dates and seas salt. They happen to be gluten and dairy free.

Make them today or tonight or tomorrow, just make them soon. You won't regret it!


Toasted almonds, dark chocolate flakey sea salt are a divine combination . When you are in the mood for a rich chocolaty treat, these brownies really hit the spot.





1/2 cup packed pitted deglet moor dates (you can use medjool dates if you prefer, and if they are super moist and soft, you can skip the soaking step

1 1/2 cups whole spelt flower

3/4 cup of unsweetened cocoa powder

1 1/2 teaspoons aluminum-free baking powder

1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons of almond butter

3/4 cup of extra virgin olive oil plus more to oil pan

3/4 cup of maple syrup

3/4 cup of maple sugar (I did not have this so I used organic cane sugar)

1/4 cup + 2 tablespoons almond milk

1/2 teaspoon of sea salt

1 tablespoon of vanilla extract

3 1/2 ounces of dark (85%) chocolate. coarsely chopped and decided. or about 3/4 cup chocolate chips

1/2 cup of toasted almonds (I used raw)

Maldon or fleur de sel or other flakey sea salt


Place dates in a medium bowl and cover with boiling water. let soak for 20 minutes or until softened then drain well

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Line pan with parchment paper: brush paper and sides of pan lightly with oil and set aside

sift flour, cocoa powder, and baking powder, into a medium bowl; whisk toto combine and set aside.

Place almond butter, olive oil, maple syrup, almond milk, salt, vanilla, and drained dates in  food processor: blend until smooth. (it's ok. if all the dates are not blended). Pour into sifted flour mixture and stir with a rubber spatula until  almost combined. Reserve 2 tablespoons of chopped chocolate and stir remaining chocolate into batter. Be careful not to over mix. Transfer batter into prepared pan and spread evenly. Sprinkle with almonds, remaining chocolate and a large pinch of Malden or fleur de sel sea salt. 

Bake for 30 minutes or until edges pull away from the sides of the pan and a toothpick , inserted into the center, comes out clean. Remove from oven and allow to cool completely. (FOR BEST RESULTS, REFRIGERATE UNTIL COMPLETELY COLD UNTIL CUTTING.) This will help to hold the brownies together. These brownies will store for three of four day in an air tight container.


recipe copyright amy chaplin